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Morgan Dollar (1878-1904, 1921)

1929 products

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Showing 1 - 24 of 1929 products
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1878 7TF Rev 78 Morgan Dollar CHAU Choice About Uncirculated SKU:I1878 - Morgan coin - Morgan silver dollar - Morgan silver dollar for sale - Profile Coins & Collectibles1878 7TF Rev 78 Morgan Dollar CHAU Choice About Uncirculated SKU:I1878 - Morgan coin - Morgan silver dollar - Morgan silver dollar for sale - Profile Coins & Collectibles
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1878 7TF Rev 78 Morgan Dollar Choice About Uncirculated SKU:I1088 - Morgan coin - Morgan silver dollar - Morgan silver dollar for sale - Profile Coins & Collectibles1878 7TF Rev 78 Morgan Dollar Choice About Uncirculated SKU:I1088 - Morgan coin - Morgan silver dollar - Morgan silver dollar for sale - Profile Coins & Collectibles
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1878 7TF Rev 78 Morgan Dollar Extremely Fine 90% Silver SKU:IPC7239 - Morgan coin - Morgan silver dollar - Morgan silver dollar for sale - Profile Coins & Collectibles1878 7TF Rev 78 Morgan Dollar Extremely Fine 90% Silver SKU:IPC7239 - Morgan coin - Morgan silver dollar - Morgan silver dollar for sale - Profile Coins & Collectibles

Morgan Dollar (1878-1904, 1921): A Brief History

The Morgan Dollar stands as an enduring symbol of American numismatic history, reflecting the economic and social landscape of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Named after its designer, George T. Morgan, this silver coin holds more than just monetary value; it encapsulates the stories of a nation undergoing transformation and growth. Being one of the most popular collectible U.S. coins, the Morgan silver dollar has earned the title “The King of America’s Coins”. 

The inception of the Morgan Silver Dollar can be traced back to the Coinage Act of 1873, which ushered in a shift from the bimetallic standard (gold and silver) to the gold standard. This legislation led to the discontinuation of silver dollar coinage, leaving a void in the market that would later be filled by the Morgan Silver Dollar. In 1878, the Bland-Allison Act authorized the revival of silver dollar production, aiming to appease the silver mining interests prevalent in the western United States. 

George T. Morgan, a British-born engraver who had joined the United States Mint in 1876, was tasked with designing the new silver dollar. His creation, the Morgan Dollar, made its debut in 1878. The coin featured a profile of Lady Liberty on the obverse, with intricate details that set it apart from previous designs. The reverse bore a striking depiction of a bald eagle, its wings outstretched, grasping arrows and an olive branch, symbolizing America's readiness for both war and peace. 

Beyond its aesthetic appeal, the Morgan Dollar was deeply intertwined with economic and political debates of the era. The coin's production was closely linked to the silver mining industry's demands for a market for their product. The fluctuating silver prices and the coin's availability influenced economic policy discussions, as well as broader debates about the monetary system and its potential impacts on the national economy. 

The Morgan Dollar's history also intersects with historical events. It witnessed the end of the Wild West era, the expansion of the railroad, and the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution. The coin bore witness to the economic challenges of the Panic of 1893 and the subsequent transition to the gold standard with the passage of the Gold Standard Act in 1900. This marked the eventual decline in silver dollar production, leading to the Morgan Silver Dollar's discontinuation in 1904. Several years later, the Pittman Act of 1918 mandated the melting of over 270 million Morgan Dollars to support World War I efforts. This event significantly reduced the number of coins available for collectors, creating rarity and driving up demand. In 1921, a brief resumption of production occurred due to the shortage of silver dollars. 

Today, Morgan Dollars are highly prized by collectors, historians, and numismatists alike. Its intricate design, historical significance, and the stories it carries make it a sought-after artifact that connects us to a pivotal period in American history. The coin's legacy endures not only through the specimens that have survived the test of time but also through the lessons it imparts about the intersection of economics, politics, and art in shaping a nation. 

In conclusion, the history of Morgan Dollars is a journey through America's economic evolution, reflecting the nation's response to changing circumstances, economic policies, and societal transformations. As a piece of tangible history, it serves as a window into the past, allowing us to appreciate the intricate interplay between currency, culture, and commerce in the formation of a nation.  

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